24 May: Bristol Cathedral Exhibition

Now we are at the end of the summer I realised that I have been very lax and not written my blog for some time but perhaps quality is better than quantity.  I have also spent long periods of PhD research and writing at home,  and producing nothing of great interest to anyone reading this blog.  So the next entries will being everything up to date.

Back in May my PhD research subject ‘Florence Farmborough’ was featured in a national WW1 touring exhibition ‘No Man’s Land’, which opened in the early part of the year in Bradford.   Alongside Farmborough it also featured images and artefacts by Elsie Knocker and Mairi Chisholm, Olive Edis, Clarice Spratling and Dawn Cole, Chloe Dewe Mathews and Alison Baskerville.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Although the cathedral was a wonderful building having been to the private view and the opening in Bradford, I felt this exhibition worked better within a gallery setting. The cathedral exhibits were not sited together so the visitor had to search in different locations which I felt led to a loss of continuity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After Bristol the exhibition was moving to Leigh and later Bishop Auckland. It was good to be able to see some of these images again. The recent images by Alison Baskerville and Chloe Dewe Mathews are certainly worth further investigation.

 

 

8 Oct: John Akomfrah at Turner Contemporary

Following the walk to the Garden Gate Project, to coincide with the opening of the new exhibition at the gallery; a session was held with John Akomfrah in conversation with BBC historian David Olusoga.  The film by John is being shown as part of the exhibition.

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John had made the film installation (initially commissioned for the Venice Biennale 2014) entitled ‘Vertigo Sea’ which I had previously seen at the Arnolfini Gallery in Bristol.  It is an extremely powerful and emotive film which addresses issues that are still relevant to issues today.  I was anxious to meet him in person and engage in a brief conversation which I was able to do!

21 April: Bristol Evening Photography shoot

This was organised by Red Cloud Experience days and given to me as a Christmas present.  It was an opportunity to try things not generally covered at university although it was principally aimed at beginners and those with little experience.  So I was able my own devices to experiment and to capture images within the safety of working in a group setting.

The following are some of the images that were taken:

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18 August: Bristol Balloon Fiesta 08.08.2015

This is the first year I have managed to incorporate the Fiesta with a visit to family in Bristol and the day turned into an event which I will not forget in a hurry.  Never having been to a festival before I had no idea as the number of people this free event would attract, plus the fact that the weather was very much in our favour.

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Before the evening launch there were various aerial displays.

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I was able to take images from the fence separating the launch area from the spectators and realised that a lot more is involved in launching the balloons than I previously had thought possible, with all ages being involved in the operations.

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Once airborne it was a breath-taking sight and evoked a loud cheer from the crowd every time a balloon took to the sky.

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Another time I need to investigate about how I can gain access to the press enclosure, as it would have enabled me to walk around the launch site to take pictures, instead of trying to take them from the side-lines.

The Fiesta ended with a really spectacular ‘Night Glow’ where the burners were set of into the part inflated balloons in time to music.  I later discovered that the site had been closed and in turn the Clifton Suspension Bridge as an exit route from the site back into the city, due to the capacity of the crowd.  So the exit route involved a long round trip back to the M5 motorway before being able to access Bristol city centre.